Materials Requirement Planning - MRP

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DEFINITION of 'Materials Requirement Planning - MRP'

One of the first software based integrated information systems designed to improve productivity for businesses. A materials requirement planning (MRP) information system is a sales forecast-based system used to schedule raw material deliveries and quantities, given assumptions of machine and labor units required to fulfill a sales forecast.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Materials Requirement Planning - MRP'

MRP was the earliest of the integrated information systems dealing with improvements in productivity for businesses with the use of computers and software technology to provide meaningful data to managers. With the advent of such systems, production efficiency could be greatly improved. As the analysis of data and the technology to capture it became more sophisticated, more comprehensive systems were developed to integrate MRP with other aspects of the manufacturing process.

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