Matched Sale-Purchase Agreement - MSPA

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DEFINITION of 'Matched Sale-Purchase Agreement - MSPA'

An arrangement whereby the Federal Reserve sells government securities (U.S. Treasuries) to an institutional dealer or the central bank of another country with the contractual agreement to purchase the security back within a short period of time, usually less than two weeks. The security is bought back at the same price at which it was sold, and decreases banking reserves during the term of the matched sale-purchase agreement.

This is also known as a "system MSP".

BREAKING DOWN 'Matched Sale-Purchase Agreement - MSPA'

This is a rarely-used method of temporarily decreasing reserves and securities holdings, and is done to slightly prohibit market liquidity for the term of the MSP. This financial arrangement is different than the standard open-market operations (such as selling Treasuries to investors) where actions done by the Federal Reserve make permanent changes to banking reserves and securities levels.

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