Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board - MSRB

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DEFINITION of 'Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board - MSRB'

A regulating body that creates rules and policies for investment firms and banks in the issuing and sale of municipal bonds, notes and other municipal securities by states, cities and counties. Activities regulated by the MSRB include the underwriting, trading and selling of municipal securities financing public projects.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board - MSRB'

The MSRB was established by the United States Congress in 1975. Like the New York Stock Exchange or the National Association of Securities Dealers, the MSRB is a self-regulatory organization that is subject to supervision by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

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