Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency - MIGA

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency - MIGA'

An organization established in 1988 by the World Bank and based in Washington, D.C. The goal of Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA) is to promote investment in developing countries. The organization offers a variety of services in order to encourage foreign direct investment, including risk insurance against foreign exchange restrictions, outbreak of conflicts or wars, imposed spending limits and related restrictions on company assets.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency - MIGA'

In addition to providing political risk insurance to corporations that want to invest in developing countries, MIGA offers advisory services to developing country governments. The organization advises on the policies and procedures these governments should follow and the best ways these countries can attract foreign investment. Other services by the MIGA include licensing arrangements, franchising and technology support.



RELATED TERMS
  1. International Bank Of Reconstruction ...

    A component of the United Nation's World Bank Group that was ...
  2. World Bank Group

    Five international organizations dedicated to providing financial ...
  3. Inter-American Development Bank ...

    A cooperative development bank founded in 1959 to accelerate ...
  4. The World Bank

    An international organization dedicated to providing financing, ...
  5. International Monetary Fund - IMF

    An international organization created for the purpose of: 1. ...
  6. Ginnie Mae Pass Through

    A type of investment issued by the Government National Mortgage ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the relationship between research and development and innovation?

    Although it's possible to achieve innovation without research and development and it's possible to conduct research and development ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What kinds of costs are included in Free on Board (FOB) shipping?

    Free on board (FOB) shipping is a trade term published by the International Chamber of Commerce or ICC, that indicates which ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why would a country's gross domestic product (GDP) and gross national income (GNI) ...

    A country’s gross domestic product, or GDP, and gross national income, or GNI, are likely to differ considerably because ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What types of companies benefit from reporting results utilizing constant currencies ...

    Any company that does a substantial amount of business in foreign countries, and is therefore subject to foreign currency ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the differences between B-shares and H-shares traded on Chinese stock exchanges?

    Equity listings in China generally fall under three primary categories: A shares, B shares and H shares. B shares represent ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are some examples of smart beta ETFs that use passive and active management?

    There are a number of smart beta exchange-traded funds (ETFs) that use passive and active management, including the WisdomTree ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    Can The IMF Solve Global Economic Problems?

    The IMF is an important tool to help struggling countries, but it's not without its problems.
  2. Fundamental Analysis

    How Globalization Affects Developed Countries

    The increase in communications technology has companies competing in a global market.
  3. Insurance

    What Is The World Bank?

    You've heard of the World Bank, now find out how it functions and why some groups oppose it.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    An Introduction To The International Monetary Fund (IMF)

    Chances are you've heard of the IMF. But what does it do, and why is it so controversial?
  5. Economics

    What Is An Emerging Market Economy?

    Emerging markets provide new investment opportunities, but there are risks - both to residents and foreign investors.
  6. Investing Basics

    Understanding Related-Party Transactions

    In business, a related-party transaction refers to a transaction where parties on both sides have a common interest or relationship.
  7. Professionals

    Top Strategies to Attract Elite Clients

    Here's how to think outside of the box when it comes to attracting a high-net-worth client base.
  8. Credit & Loans

    What is a Syndicated Loan?

    A syndicated loan is one that involves a group of lenders (called the syndicate) who pool their lending resources to make a loan.
  9. Economics

    What are Deliverables?

    Deliverables is a project management term describing an object or function that must be provided or completed by a certain due date.
  10. Economics

    What Does Capital Intensive Mean?

    Capital intensive refers to a business or industry that requires a substantial amount of money or financial resources to engage in its specific business.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Inbound Cash Flow

    Any currency that a company or individual receives through conducting a transaction with another party. Inbound cash flow ...
  2. Social Security

    A United States federal program of social insurance and benefits developed in 1935. The Social Security program's benefits ...
  3. American Dream

    The belief that anyone, regardless of where they were born or what class they were born into, can attain their own version ...
  4. Multicurrency Note Facility

    A credit facility that finances short- to medium-term Euro notes. Multicurrency note facilities are denominated in many currencies. ...
  5. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
  6. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt obligations of the U.S. government. Treasuries are considered ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!