Multinational Pooling

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DEFINITION of 'Multinational Pooling'

A method global companies use to manage the risk of their employee benefit plans throughout the world. The different employee benefit programs of a mulinational company are combined to form an international pool. The result of multinational pooling is financial savings and better control of the risks.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Multinational Pooling'

There are two types of multinational pooling: company-specific and multi-client. Company-specific pooling is used by multinationals with international clients who are large enough to do the pooling on their own. Multi-client pools are available for companies who are less global but can none the less save costs by joining forces with other companies.

The merits of multinational pooling include:
- Economies of scale and purchasing power
- Global experience rating
- Financial cost savings
- Improved underwriting terms and conditions
- Annual reporting
- Management tool and information base

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