Mutualization

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DEFINITION of 'Mutualization'

The process of changing a firm's business structure so the owners of the company are eligible to receive cash distributions from the company in direct proportion to the amount of revenue the company earns from each member. This form of business structure is also known as a cooperative in some jurisdictions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Mutualization'

The mutual business structure can be very beneficial to a member, as each member will receive a dividend for doing business with the company, but this distribution may be a tax-free distribution depending on the laws of the jurisdiction in which the member lives. An examples of a mutualized company is a grocery chain in which each shopper can become a member and receive money each year for shopping at that grocery chain.

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