Mutually Exclusive

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DEFINITION of 'Mutually Exclusive'

A statistical term used to describe a situation where the occurrence of one event is not influenced or caused by another event. In addition, it is impossible for mutually exclusive events to occur at the same time.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Mutually Exclusive'

For example, recording two separate roles of one die are mutually exclusive events. Whatever number the dice displays on its first roll will have no impact on what number is rolled the second time. In addition, it is impossible for the first and second roll to occur at the same time.

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