Mutually Exclusive

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Mutually Exclusive'

A statistical term used to describe a situation where the occurrence of one event is not influenced or caused by another event. In addition, it is impossible for mutually exclusive events to occur at the same time.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Mutually Exclusive'

For example, recording two separate roles of one die are mutually exclusive events. Whatever number the dice displays on its first roll will have no impact on what number is rolled the second time. In addition, it is impossible for the first and second roll to occur at the same time.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Sampling Error

    A statistical error to which an analyst exposes a model simply ...
  2. Statistics

    A type of mathematical analysis involving the use of quantified ...
  3. Sample Selection Bias

    A type of bias caused by choosing non-random data for statistical ...
  4. Non-Sampling Error

    A statistical error caused by human error to which a specific ...
  5. Statistically Significant

    The likelihood that a result or relationship is caused by something ...
  6. Administrative Order On Consent ...

    An agreement between an individual or business and a regulatory ...
Related Articles
  1. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    5 Ways To Measure Mutual Fund Risk

    These statistical measurements highlight how to mitigate risk and increase rewards.
  2. Economics

    Where do funds report their r-squared?

    Learn where to find R-squared calculations for mutual funds. Explore R-squared, Alpha and Beta and how these calculations measure securities' performance.
  3. Fundamental Analysis

    How do you calculate r-squared in Excel?

    Calculate R-squared in Microsoft Excel by creating two data ranges to correlate. Use the Correlate formula to correlate both sets of data, or x and y.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    What are the most common issues with Serial Correlation in stocks?

    Read about the concept of serial correlation in stock returns, and learn why market analysts are divided about the efficacy of trading based on stock patterns.
  5. Trading Strategies

    How far back in a stock's history should you go when gauging its volatility?

    Discover why it can be difficult for investors to figure out how far back to go into a stock's history when gauging its volatility.
  6. Trading Strategies

    What are common examples of Serial Correlation in finance?

    Take a deeper look at serial correlation in finance, and find out why most attempts at discovering serial correlation among asset prices have failed.
  7. Investing

    How to Use Stratified Random Sampling

    Stratified random sampling is a technique best used with a sample population easily broken into distinct subgroups. Samples are then taken from each subgroup based on the ratio of the subgroup’s ...
  8. Retirement

    Time To Hire A Senior Move Manager?

    Watch for these signs that you or an elderly family member may need to downsize and move somewhere easier to manange. A senior move manager can help.
  9. Retirement

    A New Solution To Help Seniors Relocate

    As Americans age – and families try to cope – the new field of senior move managers helps seniors relocate to safer homes with the least possible stress.
  10. Personal Finance

    What is the average salary for an accountant?

    Learn about the average salaries of various accounting positions, and see the difference that an accounting degree makes in attaining higher wages.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Weight Of Ice, Snow Or Sleet Insurance

    Financial protection against damage caused to property by winter weather specifically, damage caused if a roof caves in because ...
  2. Weather Insurance

    A type of protection against a financial loss that may be incurred because of rain, snow, storms, wind, fog, undesirable ...
  3. Portfolio Turnover

    A measure of how frequently assets within a fund are bought and sold by the managers. Portfolio turnover is calculated by ...
  4. Commercial Paper

    An unsecured, short-term debt instrument issued by a corporation, typically for the financing of accounts receivable, inventories ...
  5. Federal Funds Rate

    The interest rate at which a depository institution lends funds maintained at the Federal Reserve to another depository institution ...
  6. Fixed Asset

    A long-term tangible piece of property that a firm owns and uses in the production of its income and is not expected to be ...
Trading Center