Myron S. Scholes

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DEFINITION of 'Myron S. Scholes'

An American economist and winner of the 1997 Nobel Prize in Economics along with Robert Merton for their method of determining the value of stock options, the Black-Scholes model. (Fischer Black, the co-author of the Black-Scholes equation on which the model is based, died in 1995.) Scholes' research has also focused on taxation and incentives.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Myron S. Scholes'

Scholes earned an MBA and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. He taught at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the University of Chicago before joining Stanford in 1983 as a finance professor. Scholes was also a co-founder of the hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management, which was initially extremely successful but later failed spectacularly, which led to a group of large banks bailing them out to prevent an averse reaction in the financial markets.

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