Naked Trust

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DEFINITION of 'Naked Trust'

A straightforward type of trust into which a trustor transfers assets (money or property) in order to pass them on to beneficiaries. The initial owner of the assets (the trustor) loses all control over them once they are placed in the trust. The trustee has only nominal control of the assets in the trust. The trust's beneficiary has absolute entitlement to the assets once he or she turns 18.

Also known as a "bare trust," "dry trust" or "passive trust."

BREAKING DOWN 'Naked Trust'

This estate-planning tool is commonly used by parents or grandparents to transfer assets to children or grandchildren. The college financial-aid implications of putting money into a naked trust for children should be considered before establishing the trust.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Can I put my IRA in a trust?

    You cannot put your IRA in a trust while you are living. You can, however, name a trust as the beneficiary of your IRA and ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does the trust maker transfer funds into a revocable trust?

    Once a revocable trust is created, a trust maker transfers funds or property into the trust by including them in a list with ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between a revocable trust and a living trust?

    A revocable trust and living trust are separate terms that describe the same thing: a trust in which the terms can be changed ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How exactly does one go about revoking a revocable trust?

    The basic steps involved in revoking a revocable trust are fairly simple, and include transfer of assets and an official ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between a revocable trust and an irrevocable trust?

    An irrevocable trust and a revocable trust are differentiated through the ability to change the trust. With an irrevocable ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is a family Limited Liability Company (LLC)?

    A family limited liability company (LLC) is formed by family members to conduct business in a state that permits such form ... Read Full Answer >>

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