Naked Put

DEFINITION of 'Naked Put'

A put option whose writer does not have a short position in the stock on which he or she has written the put. Sometimes referred to as an "uncovered put."

BREAKING DOWN 'Naked Put'

Naked puts are very risky since the writer can lose big if the underlying asset moves opposite to the desired direction. But, profits are huge if the underlying asset moves in the right direction.

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