Narrow Moat

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Narrow Moat'

A slight competitive advantage that one company enjoys over competing firms operating in the same or similar type of industry. A narrow moat is still an advantage for a company, but it is one that only provides a limited amount of economic benefit and will typically last for only a relatively short period of time before competition marginalizes its importance.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Narrow Moat'

The phrase "economic moat" was coined by legendary investor Warren Buffett. This phrase has since been refined to differentiate between "wide moats" and "narrow moats". Wide economic moats offer substantial economic benefits and are expected to endure for a prolonged period of time, while narrow moats offer more modest economic benefits and typically last for a shorter period of time.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Warren Buffett

    Known as "the Oracle of Omaha", Buffett is Chairman of Berkshire ...
  2. Absolute Advantage

    The ability of a country, individual, company or region to produce ...
  3. Competitive Advantage

    An advantage that a firm has over its competitors, allowing it ...
  4. Wide Economic Moat

    A type of sustainable competitive advantage that a business possesses ...
  5. Economic Moat

    The competitive advantage that one company has over other companies ...
  6. Soft Economic Moat

    A type of economic moat (or competitive advantage) that is based ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is an economic moat?

    The term economic moat, coined and popularized by Warren Buffett, refers to a business' ability to maintain competitive advantages ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the utility function and how is it calculated?

    In economics, utility function is an important concept that measures preferences over a set of goods and services. Utility ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What does marginal utility tell us about consumer choice?

    In microeconomics, utility represents a way to relate the amount of goods consumed to the amount of happiness or satisfaction ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How is the marginal cost of production used to find an optimum production level?

    The marginal cost of production can be tracked to show the optimal production level where per-unit production cost is lowest ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between JIT (just in time) and CMI (customer managed inventory)?

    Just-in-time (JIT) inventory management focuses solely on the need to replenish inventory only when it is required, reducing ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are some examples of Apple and Google's best-selling product lines?

    There are many good examples of product lines in the technology sector from some of the largest companies in the world, such ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Active Trading

    Competitive Advantage Counts

    What's the best indicator of a company's future success? Its ability to succeed when others fail.
  2. Professionals

    Advertising, Crocodiles And Moats

    Memorable advertising is a brick in the fortress that keeps competitors at bay.
  3. Active Trading

    Economic Moats: A Successful Company's Best Defense

    Find out why some companies thrive while others flounder.
  4. Economics

    What are Barriers to Entry?

    A barrier to entry is any obstacle that restricts or impedes a company’s efforts to enter an industry.
  5. Economics

    Explaining Aggregate Supply

    Aggregate supply is the total supply of goods and services an economy produces in a given time period.
  6. Economics

    Whole Foods 365: The Economics of Discount Organic

    Whole Foods Market is expanding its brand to create a chain of discount natural food stores called 365 by Whole Foods Market. With the high cost of producing, shipping and selling organic food, ...
  7. Economics

    What Does Inferior Good Mean?

    The term “inferior good” does not describe a lack of quality, but rather, is an economic term used when discussing elasticity of demand for a good.
  8. Economics

    What Is a Giffen Good?

    A Giffen good is a product whose demand increases as its price increases, and falls when its price falls.
  9. Economics

    What Does Going Concern Mean?

    Going concern is a concept used in business and accounting to describe the fiscal health of a company.
  10. Investing Basics

    Explaining Counterparty Risk

    Counterparty risk is the risk that the other party in an agreement will default, or fail to live up to its contractual obligation.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Xetra

    An all-electronic trading system based in Frankfurt, Germany. Launched in 1997 and operated by the Deutsche Börse, the Xetra ...
  2. Nuncupative Will

    A verbal will that must have two witnesses and can only deal with the distribution of personal property. A nuncupative will ...
  3. OsMA

    An abbreviation for Oscillator - Moving Average. OsMA is used in technical analysis to represent the variance between an ...
  4. Investopedia

    One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers ...
  5. Unfair Claims Practice

    The improper avoidance of a claim by an insurer or an attempt to reduce the size of the claim. By engaging in unfair claims ...
  6. Killer Bees

    An individual or firm that helps a company fend off a takeover attempt. A killer bee uses defensive strategies to keep an ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!