National Currency

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DEFINITION of 'National Currency'

The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is usually the predominant currency used for most financial transactions in that country.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'National Currency'

A handful of national currencies such as the U.S. dollar and the euro have achieved global status as reserve currencies and are extensively used in international trade transactions. The euro has supplanted the national currencies of a number of nations that comprise the European Union. The national currencies of some countries such as the United Arab Emirates are pegged or fixed to the U.S. dollar.

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