National Stock Exchange

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DEFINITION of 'National Stock Exchange'

The first stock exchange in America that was completely electronically automated. All members of the exchange are registered broker-dealers. This exchange created the National Securities Trading System (NSTS), which performs all auction market tasks on an automated basis.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'National Stock Exchange'

The National Stock Exchange was originally founded in Cincinnati in 1885. It was formerly known as the Cincinnati Stock Exchange, but moved to Chicago in 1995 and changed its name in 2003. The National Stock Exchange can also refer to stock in India or Australia.

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