Natural Hedge

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Dictionary Says

Definition of 'Natural Hedge'


A method of reducing financial risk by investing in two different financial instruments whose performance tends to cancel each other out. A natural hedge is unlike other types of hedges in that it does not require the use of sophisticated financial products such as forwards or derivatives. However, most hedges (natural or otherwise) are imperfect, and do not eliminate risk completely.

Investopedia Says

Investopedia explains 'Natural Hedge'


For example, bonds are a natural hedge against stocks because bonds tend to perform well when stocks are performing poorly and vice versa. Pair trading is another type of natural hedge. It involves buying long and short positions in highly correlated stocks because the performance of one will offset the performance of the other.

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