Non-Banking Financial Company - NBFC

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DEFINITION of 'Non-Banking Financial Company - NBFC'

Non-banking financial companies, or NBFCs, are financial institutions that provide banking services, but do not hold a banking license. These institutions are not allowed to take deposits from the public. Nonetheless, all operations of these institutions are still covered under banking regulations.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Non-Banking Financial Company - NBFC'

NBFCs do offer all sorts of banking services, such as loans and credit facilities, retirement planning, money markets, underwriting, and merger activites. The number of non-banking financial companies has expanded greatly in the last several years as venture capital companies, retail and industrial companies have entered the lending business.

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