Normal-Course Issuer Bid - NCIB

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DEFINITION of 'Normal-Course Issuer Bid - NCIB'

A Canadian term for a company repurchasing its own stock from the public in order to cancel it. In a normal-course issuer bid (NCIB), a company is allowed to repurchase between 5 and 10% of its shares depending on how the transaction is conducted. The issuer repurchases the shares gradually over a period of time, such as one year. This repurchasing strategy allows the company to buy only when its stock is favorably priced.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Normal-Course Issuer Bid - NCIB'

Companies must file a Notice of Intention to Make a NCIB with the stock exchanges they are listed on and receive approval from the exchange before proceeding with the repurchase. There are limits on the number of shares the company can repurchase in a single day.

In another type of issuer bid, a company will repurchase a set number of shares from all of its shareholders at a predetermined date and price. An issuer bid where a company repurchases all of its shares in this manner is a going private transaction.

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