What does 'Near Money' mean

Near money is an economics term describing non-cash assets that are highly liquid, such as bank deposits, certificates of deposit (CDs) and Treasury Bills. Central banks, economists and statisticians may utilize near money when determining the current money supply. Near money refers to assets that can be quickly converted into cash. Also called quasi-money.

BREAKING DOWN 'Near Money'

Examples of liquid assets that are near money include bonds, money markets, savings accounts and widely traded foreign currencies. Assets that are considered near money may differ depending on the time frame that is used in the definition. Bank accounts, such as savings accounts, allow instant conversion to cash with no penalties. Other near money assets may take longer to access or may incur penalties, such as early withdrawal from a certificate of deposit.

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