Near Term - NT

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DEFINITION of 'Near Term - NT'

A period of time referring to a short time into the future. Near team is used to describe events that may occur soon. In finance, the term is often used to explain the timeframe during which an event or change is expected to occur. It can mean different timeframes based on the industry, security being traded or business.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Near Term - NT'

Financial market analysts may use the near term in reference to events including profits, the issuance of bonds, expectations for the next quarter, etc. For example, "Company ABC is likely to export very little gasoline in the near term due to a 20% loss of refining capacity following the emergency shutdown." Also, an analyst may indicate that stock XYZ has a bright near term outlook, meaning the company is expected to do well in the next few months.

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