Negative Correlation

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DEFINITION of 'Negative Correlation'

A relationship between two variables in which one variable increases as the other decreases, and vice versa. In statistics, a perfect negative correlation is represented by the value -1.00, while a 0.00 indicates no correlation and a +1.00 indicates a perfect positive correlation. A perfect negative correlation means that the relationship that appears to exist between two variables is negative 100% of the time. It is also possible that two variables may be negatively correlated in some, but not all, cases.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Negative Correlation'

Here are a few examples of a negative correlation: The more time I spend at the mall, the less money I have in my checking account. The higher my mutual fund's expense ratio, the lower my investment returns. The more hours I spend at the office, the less time I spend with my family.

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