Negative Feedback

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DEFINITION of 'Negative Feedback'

A pattern of contrarian investment behavior. An investor using a negative feedback strategy would buy stocks when prices declined and sell stocks when prices rose, which is the opposite of what most people do. Negative feedback helps make markets less volatile. Its opposite is positive feedback, in which a herd mentality pushes high prices higher and low prices lower.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Negative Feedback'

On an individual level, negative feedback can refer to a pattern of behavior in which a negative outcome, such as executing a losing trade, causes an investor to question his or her skill and discourages him or her from continuing to trade. Developing a rational trading plan and sticking to it can help investors maintain confidence and avoid falling into a negative feedback loop even when they execute a losing trade.


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