Negatively Amortizing Loan

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Negatively Amortizing Loan'

A loan with a payment structure that allows for a scheduled payment to be made where it is less than the interest charge on the loan at the time the scheduled payment is made. When a payment is made which is less than the interest charge at the time, deferred interest is created. The amount of deferred interest created is added to the principal balance of the loan, leading to a situation where the principal owed increases over time instead of decreases.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Negatively Amortizing Loan'

For example, consider a loan with an 8% annual interest rate, a remaining principal balance of $100,000, and a provision that allows the borrower to make $500 payments at a certain number of scheduled payment dates. The interest due on the loan at the next scheduled payment would be: 0.08 / 12 x 100,000 = $666.67. If the borrower makes a $500 payment, $166.67 in deferred interest ($666.67 - $500) will be added to the principal balance of the loan for a total remaining principal balance of $100,166.67. The next month's interest charge would be based on this new principal balance amount, and the calculation would continue each month leading to increases in the loan's principal balance, or negative amortization.

Negative amortization cannot continue indefinitely. At some point, the loan must start to amortize over its remaining term. Typically, negatively amortizing loans have scheduled dates when the payments are recalculated, so that the loan will amortize over its remaining term, or have a negative amortization limit which states that when the principal balance of the loan reaches a certain contractual limit, the payments will be recalculated.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Level Payment Mortgage

    A type of mortgage that requires the same dollar payment each ...
  2. Negative Amortization

    An increase in the principal balance of a loan caused by making ...
  3. Mortgage Recast

    A feature in some types of mortgages where the remaining scheduled ...
  4. Deferred Interest

    The amount of interest that is added to the principal balance ...
  5. Unscheduled Recast

    The unscheduled recalculation of the remaining amortization schedule ...
  6. Payment Option ARM

    A monthly adjusting adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) which allows ...
Related Articles
  1. Credit & Loans

    How Mortgage Refinancing Affects Your Net Worth

    Find out how to determine whether refinancing will put you ahead or even more behind.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Profit From Mortgage Debt With MBS

    Mortgage-backed securities can offer monthly income, a fixed interest rate and even government backing.
  3. Home & Auto

    Option ARMs: American Dream Or Mortgage Nightmare?

    Option adjustable rate mortgages could make or break your home-buying experience.
  4. Investing

    What is the difference between amortization and depreciation?

    Because very few assets last forever, one of the main principles of accrual accounting requires that an asset's cost be proportionally expensed based on the time period over which the asset was ...
  5. Technical Indicators

    What is a good gearing ratio?

    Understand the meaning of the gearing ratio, how it is calculated, the definition of high and low gearing, and how they reflect relative financial stability.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    What is a bad interest coverage ratio?

    Understand how interest coverage ratio is calculated and what it signifies, and learn what market analysts consider to be an unacceptably low coverage ratio.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    What is the difference between a capital gearing ratio and a net gearing ratio?

    Understand the definition of gearing in the finance industry, the difference between net gearing and capital gearing ratios and how they are interpreted.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    What is the difference between interest coverage ratio and DSCR?

    Understand the basics of the interest coverage ratio and the debt-service coverage ratio, including calculations and how each type reflects financial stability.
  9. Investing Basics

    What is the difference between interest coverage ratio and TIE?

    Read about the times interest earned, also known as the interest coverage ratio. Find out why this is an important ratio for investors and creditors.
  10. Investing Basics

    What is accrual accounting used for in finance?

    Read about the accrual method of accounting, its uses and rules, and why it is considered so important for investors, lenders and managers.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Commodity

    1. A basic good used in commerce that is interchangeable with other commodities of the same type. Commodities are most often ...
  2. Deferred Revenue

    Advance payments or unearned revenue, recorded on the recipient's balance sheet as a liability, until the services have been ...
  3. Multinational Corporation - MNC

    A corporation that has its facilities and other assets in at least one country other than its home country. Such companies ...
  4. SWOT Analysis

    A tool that identifies the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of an organization. Specifically, SWOT is a basic, ...
  5. Simple Interest

    A quick method of calculating the interest charge on a loan. Simple interest is determined by multiplying the interest rate ...
  6. Special Administrative Region - SAR

    Unique geographical areas with a high degree of autonomy set up by the People's Republic of China. The Special Administrative ...
Trading Center