Negotiable Bill Of Lading

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DEFINITION of 'Negotiable Bill Of Lading'

A contract of carriage that can be transferred to a third party. A straight or uniform bill of lading, in contrast, may not by transferred and is only deliverable to the named consignee (recipient). Like any bill of lading, the negotiable bill of lading also lists the goods being transported and serves as a contract of the terms of the shipment.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Negotiable Bill Of Lading'

Also known as an order bill of lading, the negotiable bill of lading transfers control (title) of the goods to the order of the entity named on the document. A bill of lading must be clean in order to be negotiable. To transfer the negotiable bill of lading, the consignor (the person or business shipping the goods) must stamp and sign the bill and the carrier must deliver it.

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