Net Debt To EBITDA Ratio

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DEFINITION of 'Net Debt To EBITDA Ratio'

A measurement of leverage, calculated as a company's interest-bearing liabilities minus cash or cash equivalents, divided by its EBITDA. The net debt to EBITDA ratio is a debt ratio that shows how many years it would take for a company to pay back its debt if net debt and EBITDA are held constant. If a company has more cash than debt, the ratio can be negative.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Net Debt To EBITDA Ratio'

The net debt to EBITDA ratio is popular with analysts because it takes into account a company's ability to decrease its debt. Ratios higher than 4 or 5 typically set off alarm bells because this indicates that a company is less likely to be able to handle its debt burden, and thus is less likely to be able to take on the additional debt required to grow the business. Ultimately, however, it depends on the benchmark of the industry you are looking at.

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