Net Institutional Sales - NIS

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DEFINITION of 'Net Institutional Sales - NIS'

A measurement used when screening for securities which are being sold by institutional investors. NIS examines the net sales of a company's shares by large institutional investors such as pension and hedge funds. A stock with a high (negative) amount of NIS would suggest that institutional investors no longer feel they should hold the stock.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Net Institutional Sales - NIS'

NIS is a popular screening category used by traders hoping to catch which stocks are actively being sold net short by institutional investors. The measurement is a net number because it compares overall buys of the stock to overall selling of the stock. As calculated as a ratio, a stock with a NIS ratio of -10% would suggest that institutional investors are selling 11 shares of the firm for every 10 they buy.

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