Net Interest Income

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DEFINITION

The difference between the revenue that is generated from a bank's assets and the expenses associated with paying out its liabilities. A typical bank's assets consist of all forms of personal and commercial loans, mortgages and securities. The liabilities are, of course, the customer deposits. The excess revenue that is generated from the spread between interest paid out on deposits and interest earned on assets is the net interest income.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

The net interest income of some banks is more sensitive to changes in interest rates than others. This can vary according to several factors, such as the type of assets and liabilities that are held. Banks with variable rate assets and liabilities will obviously be more vulnerable to changes in interest rates than those with fixed-rate assets. Banks with liabilities that reprice more often or quicker than its assets will also be affected by interest rate changes.


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