Net Profits Interest

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Net Profits Interest'

A percentage that is paid out of the working interest owner's share of net profits. This is a non-operating interest that may be created when the owner of a property - typically an offshore oil and gas property - leases it out to another party for development and production. A net profits interest may be granted instead of a royalty interest, where the holder receives a share of gross revenues rather than net profits.

The holder of a net profits interest is not liable for paying a proportionate share of losses if the property is unprofitable. However, depending on the stipulations of the lease contract, the working interest owner may recover these losses from future payments of net profit.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Net Profits Interest'

For example, such an interest may be created when Company A, which owns the rights to explore and develop an oil and gas property, leases it to Company B, in exchange for a 12% share in net profits from the leased property. In a given year, if Company B makes $10 million in net profits after deducting all allowable and applicable expenses from revenue generated from the property, $1.2 million would be payable to Company A as its share of net profits.

In order to avoid legal complications down the road, the exact definition of net profits and the expenses that are allowed to be deducted from revenue to arrive at it should be clearly specified in the lease contract. Accounting transparency is another prerequisite.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Mineral Rights

    A landowner's right to receive a portion of the profits of any ...
  2. Royalty Interest

    In the oil and gas industry this refers to ownership of a portion ...
  3. Working Interests

    Refers to a form of investment in oil and gas drilling operations ...
  4. Property Rights

    Laws created by governments in regards to how individuals can ...
  5. Master Limited Partnership - MLP

    A type of limited partnership that is publicly traded. There ...
  6. Yield On Earning Assets

    A financial solvency ratio that compares a financial institution’s ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How are contingent liabilities reflected on a balance sheet

    Contingent liabilities need to pass two thresholds before they can be reported in the financial statements. First, it must ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do businesses determine if an asset may be impaired?

    In the United States, assets are considered impaired when net carrying value (book value) exceeds expected future cash flows. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How can I set up an accrual accounting system for a small business?

    First, determine whether accrual accounting makes the most sense practically and financially. If the small business is also ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why is work in progress (WIP) considered a current asset in accounting?

    Accountants consider work in progress (WIP) to be a current asset because it is a type of inventory asset. Accountants consider ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What exactly does EBITDA margin tell investors about a company?

    EBITDA stands for earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization. EBITDA margins provide investors a snapshot ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the theory of asymmetric information in economics?

    The theory of asymmetric information was developed in the 1970s and 1980s as a plausible explanation for common phenomena ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    Oil: A Big Investment With Big Tax Breaks

    Oil and gas investments can provide unmatched deduction potential for accredited investors.
  2. Active Trading

    Oil And Gas Industry Primer

    Before jumping into this hot sector, learn how these companies make their money.
  3. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Investing In Oil And Gas UITs

    Unit investment trusts provide direct exposure to the energy sector, fueling better returns.
  4. Forex Education

    A Primer On Offshore Drilling

    Learn the important ratios and terms that you'll need to know to get involved in this trading sector.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    Accounting For Differences In Oil And Gas Accounting

    How a company accounts for its expenses affects how its net income and cash flow numbers are reported.
  6. Economics

    What Is Supply?

    Supply is the amount of goods a producer is willing to produce at a given price, and is one of the most basic concepts in economics.
  7. Economics

    Modified Internal Rate of Return (MIRR)

    Modified internal rate of return (MIRR) is a variant of the more traditional internal rate of return calculation.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    What is Quantitative Analysis?

    Quantitative analysis refers to the use of mathematical computations to analyze markets and investments.
  9. Economics

    Explaining Residual Value

    Residual value is a measurement of how much a fixed asset is worth at the end of its lease, or at the end of its useful life.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    Why Last In First Out Is Banned Under IFRS

    We explain why Last-In-First-Out is banned under IFRS

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Expected Return

    The amount one would anticipate receiving on an investment that has various known or expected rates of return. For example, ...
  2. Carrying Value

    An accounting measure of value, where the value of an asset or a company is based on the figures in the company's balance ...
  3. Capital Account

    A national account that shows the net change in asset ownership for a nation. The capital account is the net result of public ...
  4. Brand Equity

    The value premium that a company realizes from a product with a recognizable name as compared to its generic equivalent. ...
  5. Adverse Selection

    1. The tendency of those in dangerous jobs or high risk lifestyles to get life insurance. 2. A situation where sellers have ...
Trading Center