Net Domestic Product - NDP

What is the 'Net Domestic Product - NDP'

The net domestic product (NDP) is an annual measure of the economic output of a nation that is adjusted to account for depreciation, calculated by subtracting depreciation from the gross domestic product (GDP).

BREAKING DOWN 'Net Domestic Product - NDP'

Net domestic product accounts for capital that has been consumed over the year in the form of housing, vehicle, or machinery deterioration. The depreciation accounted for is often referred to as capital consumption allowance and represents the amount needed in order to replace those depreciated assets.

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  4. Why does accumulated depreciation have a credit balance on the balance sheet?

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