Net Exporter


DEFINITION of 'Net Exporter'

A country or territory whose value of exported goods is higher than its value of imported goods over a given period of time.

A net exporter is the opposite of a net importer.

BREAKING DOWN 'Net Exporter'

Saudi Arabia and Canada are examples of net exporting countries because they have an abundance of oil which they then sell to other countries that are unable to meet the demand for energy. It is important to note that a country can be a net exporter in a certain area, while being a net importer in other areas. For example, Japan is a net exporter of electronic devices, but it must import oil from other countries to meet its needs.

When a country's total value of exported goods is higher than its total value of imports, it is said to have a positive balance of trade.

  1. Gross Domestic Product - GDP

    The monetary value of all the finished goods and services produced ...
  2. Terms of Trade - TOT

    The value of a country's exports relative to that of its imports. ...
  3. Net Exports

    The value of a country's total exports minus the value of its ...
  4. Net Borrower

    An entity that borrows more than it saves or lends out. A net ...
  5. Import

    A good or service brought into one country from another. Along ...
  6. Export

    A function of international trade whereby goods produced in one ...
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