Net Exports

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DEFINITION of 'Net Exports'

The value of a country's total exports minus the value of its total imports. It is used to calculate a country's aggregate expenditures, or GDP, in an open economy.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Net Exports'

In other words, net exports is the amount by which foreign spending on a home country's goods and services exceeds the home country's spending on foreign goods and services. For example, if foreigners buy $200 billion worth of U.S. exports and Americans buy $150 billion worth of foreign imports in a given year, net exports would be positive $50 billion. Factors affecting net exports include prosperity abroad, tariffs and exchange rates.

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