Nevada Corporation

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DEFINITION of 'Nevada Corporation'

A business incorporated in the state of Nevada, which is known to be business-friendly through its tax and corporate law statutes. Companies that incorporate in Nevada have several distinct advantages, including no state income tax, no franchise taxes, no personal income taxes and no succession taxes.

Another unique advantage of Nevada Corporations is that company officers and directors are well-protected against lawsuits arising from lawful business pursuits.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Nevada Corporation'

Nevada has become a well-utilized tax haven in recent years, drawing a large number of West Coast-based companies in the United States. In addition to public companies that choose to incorporate there, many private companies are attracted to the state because of its strong protection laws against hostile takeovers of a business.

A term known as "piercing the corporate veil" refers to the ability of a plaintiff to go after the personal assets of a company owner or director. While piercing the veil is rare in any state, Nevada is well-known for its strict adherence to the protection of personal assets and information.

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