New Growth Theory

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DEFINITION of 'New Growth Theory'

An economic growth theory that posits humans' desires and unlimited wants foster ever-increasing productivity and economic growth. The new growth theory argues that real GDP per person will perpetually increase because of people's pursuit of profits. As competition lowers the profit in one area, people have to constantly seek better ways to do things or invent new products in order to garner a higher profit. This main idea is one of the central tenets of the theory.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'New Growth Theory'

The theory also argues that innovation and new technologies don't occur simply by random chance. Rather, it depends of the number of people seeking out new innovations or technologies and how hard they are looking for them. In addition, people also have control over their knowledge capital, ie: what to study, how hard to study. If the profit incentive is great enough, people will choose to grow human capital and look harder for new innovations.

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