New York Dollar

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DEFINITION of 'New York Dollar'

The buying power of a U.S. dollar in the city of New York. The New York dollar is calculated by subtracting the additional cost of living in New York, and then adding back the additional income residents tend to command as a result. Once calculated, the remaining amount is a rough estimate of what your dollar is worth in this very expensive city.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'New York Dollar'

Living in New York is much more expensive than most other places in America. A dollar earned and spent in this city does not go as far, and once this is taken into account, you are left with the New York dollar. For example if you take $1 and subtract the additional cost of housing (15 cents), taxes (5.2 cents), basic costs (4.1 cents) and lifestyle (13.3 cents), and then add additional wages paid (16 cents), you are left with the buying power of a dollar in New York: 100 - 15 - 5.2 - 4.1 - 13.3 + 16 = 78.4 cents.

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