Non-Interest-Bearing Current Liability - NIBCL


DEFINITION of 'Non-Interest-Bearing Current Liability - NIBCL'

A category of debt entered on the liabilities side of a balance sheet under current liabilities. While a NIBCL is debt, representing a sum of money that the company owes and must pay within one year, it does not require interest payments.

BREAKING DOWN 'Non-Interest-Bearing Current Liability - NIBCL'

Here are some types of non-interest-bearing current liabilities:

- accounts payable that have no associated fees or interest
- taxes that have not yet been paid and are not increasing because of penalties or interest
- current income taxes that must be paid by the end of the year

  1. Current Assets

    A balance sheet account that represents the value of all assets ...
  2. Other Current Liabilities

    A balance sheet entry used by companies to group together current ...
  3. Current Liabilities

    A company's debts or obligations that are due within one year. ...
  4. Liability

    A company's legal debts or obligations that arise during the ...
  5. Accounts Payable - AP

    An accounting entry that represents an entity's obligation to ...
  6. Adjusted Gross Income - AGI

    A measure of income calculated from your gross income and used ...
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