Non-Interest-Bearing Current Liability - NIBCL

What is a 'Non-Interest-Bearing Current Liability - NIBCL'

A non-interest-bearing current liability (NIBCL) is a category of debt entered on the liabilities side of a balance sheet under current liabilities. While a NIBCL is debt, representing a sum of money that the company owes and must pay within one year, it does not require interest payments.

BREAKING DOWN 'Non-Interest-Bearing Current Liability - NIBCL'

Here are some types of non-interest-bearing current liabilities:

- accounts payable that have no associated fees or interest
- taxes that have not yet been paid and are not increasing because of penalties or interest
- current income taxes that must be paid by the end of the year

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