Niche Banks

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DEFINITION of 'Niche Banks'

Banks that cater to and serve the needs of a certain demographic segment of the population. Niche banks typically target a specific market or type of customer, and tailor a bank's advertising, product mix and operations to this target market's preferences.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Niche Banks'

A good example of a niche bank is the Golf Savings Bank, which sponsors golf tournaments and offers up to $10,000 for PGA members who score a hole in one and have a specific account at the bank.

Other good examples of niche banks include Reid Temple AME Church Federal Credit Union, which has convenient hours before and after church on Sundays, and BowieBanc, which offered an ATM card with a picture of David Bowie before it shut down.

If considering a niche bank, it is important to make sure it is FDIC insured, and to ensure that it is a separately chartered entity and not affiliated with a bank where you might already have deposits. This is because the FDIC generally limits deposit insurance to $100,000 per person per chartered institution.

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