No Dealing Desk

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DEFINITION of 'No Dealing Desk'

A way of forex trading that provides immediate access to the interbank market. The interbank market is where foreign currencies are traded. This is different than trading through the dealing desks that are found in many banks and financial institutions. By using a dealing desk, a forex broker who is registered as a Futures Commission Merchant (FCM) and Retail Foreign Exchange Dealer (RFED) can offset trades. If a no dealing desk system is used, positions are automatically offset and then transmitted directly to the interbank.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'No Dealing Desk'

Forex brokers who use this system work directly with market liquidity providers. When trading through a no dealing desk, instead of dealing with one liquidity provider, an investor is dealing with numerous providers in order to get the most competitive bid and ask prices. An investor using this method has access to instantly executable rates.

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