Non-Objecting Beneficial Owner - NOBO


DEFINITION of 'Non-Objecting Beneficial Owner - NOBO'

A beneficial owner who gives permission to a financial intermediary to release the owner's name and address to the company(ies) or issuer(s) in which they have bought securities. Companies and issuers request this personal information so they can contact the shareholder regarding important shareholder communications (such as proxies, circulars for rights offerings and annual/quarterly reports).

BREAKING DOWN 'Non-Objecting Beneficial Owner - NOBO'

A beneficial owner of a security is someone who has a security or securities held by a financial intermediary. This tends to be the individual's broker, or, in some cases, it may be another financial intermediary the person is associated with. An objecting beneficial owner (OBO)instructs the financial intermediary who holds the securities to not provide the owner's name and personal information to the company that issued the securities. When you set up your account with a broker, you will often have the choice as to whether or not you would like your information released to the companies in which you purchase shares.

  1. Proxy Materials

    Documents regulated by the Securities & Exchange Commission ...
  2. Street Name

    When securities are held in the name of a broker or other nominee, ...
  3. Information Circular

    A document sent to shareholders outlining important matters to ...
  4. Beneficial Owner

    1. A person who enjoys the benefits of ownership even though ...
  5. In Street Name

    A brokerage account where the customer's securities and assets ...
  6. Annual Report

    1. An annual publication that public corporations must provide ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    Knowing Your Rights As A Shareholder

    We delve into common stock owners' privileges and how to be vigilant in monitoring a company.
  2. Brokers

    The Next Industries Bound to be Uberized

    As more startups succeed with the sharing economy business model, investors seek out businesses poised to disrupt their industries like Uber.
  3. Budgeting

    When Using a Money Order Makes Sense

    Money orders are usually the least expensive way to send "cleared" funds to pay a bill (or traffic ticket). Here's how they work and what to watch out for.
  4. Brokers

    How Real Estate Agent and Broker Fees Work

    Buying or selling a home? What you need to know about real estate agent and broker fees.
  5. Professionals

    The Role of a Prime Broker

    Understand the role of a prime brokerage, and learn about the services investment banks provide for hedge funds while in the role of being a prime broker.
  6. Brokers

    How RIAs and Independent Broker-Dealers Differ

    There are many types of financial planners. Here we break down what sets RIAs apart from independent broker-dealers.
  7. Professionals

    The Pros and Cons of a Hybrid Advisor Practice

    Deciding whether or not operating as a hybrid makes sense for your practice? Consider the following first.
  8. Brokers

    How to Find Wealthier Financial Advisory Clients

    Most financial advisors are eager to add more and wealthier clients to their practice. Here's what it takes.
  9. Professionals

    Career Advice: Stockbroker Vs. Financial Advisor

    Read a detailed comparison between life as a stockbroker versus a financial advisor; find out how the two are different and which one is best for you.
  10. Investing Basics

    Why Use a Discount Broker?

    A discount broker is a stockbroker that does not offer clients investment advice, but trades shares for a smaller commission than a full-service broker.
  1. Who is responsible for protecting and managing shareholders' interests?

    The average shareholder, who is typically not involved in the day-to-day operations of the company, relies on several parties ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What does "in street name" mean, and why are securities held this way?

    In almost every instance when you buy or sell securities with a broker, your name is not actually on the stock or bond certificate. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. If I reject the tender offer for acquisition of the stock that I own in a company ...

    Since the passing of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, a significant number of public companies have chosen to go private. The reasons ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How long does a stock account have to be dormant before it can be escheated?

    A stock account is typically considered dormant and eligible for escheatment after five years of inactivity; however, this ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the interest rate offered on a typical margin account?

    Interest rates on margin accounts vary according to the size of the loan and the brokerage firm being used. Generally, interest ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the cost of a share purchase?

    When investors purchase shares of stock, the price paid includes two components: the price of the stock and the fee charged ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Bar Chart

    A style of chart used by some technical analysts, on which, as illustrated below, the top of the vertical line indicates ...
  2. Bullish Engulfing Pattern

    A chart pattern that forms when a small black candlestick is followed by a large white candlestick that completely eclipses ...
  3. Cyber Monday

    An expression used in online retailing to describe the Monday following U.S. Thanksgiving weekend. Cyber Monday is generally ...
  4. Take A Bath

    A slang term referring to the situation of an investor who has experienced a large loss from an investment or speculative ...
Trading Center