Nominal Value

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DEFINITION of 'Nominal Value'

The stated value of an issued security. Nominal value in economics also refers to a value expressed in monetary terms for a specific year or years, without adjusting for inflation. When used in reference to securities, nominal value is also known face value or par value.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Nominal Value'

The nominal value of a security, such as a stock or bond, remains fixed for the duration of its life. What fluctuates is the security's market value, which may be markedly different from its nominal value.

In economics, nominal values of measures, such as economic growth and personal income, are unadjusted for inflation. Adjusting nominal values for inflation gives rise to real values. For example, if a nation registers GDP growth of 5% in a given year and annual inflation is 2%, real GDP growth would be 3%.

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    The nominal value of stock shares is the actual face value when the shares are issued. This represents how much the stock ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Is the nominal value of a security ever also the real value?

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  6. What's the difference between book and market value?

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  7. The real rate of return is the amount of interest earned over and above the:

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  8. How do you calculate the percentage gain or loss on an investment?

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