Nomination Committee

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DEFINITION of 'Nomination Committee'

A committee that acts under the corporate governance area of an organization. A nomination committees is focused on evaluating the board of directors of its respective firm and on examining the skills and characteristics that are needed in board candidates. Nomination committees may also have other duties, which vary from company from company.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Nomination Committee'

The nomination committee will often identify suitable candidates for various director positions. Other responsibilities may include reviewing and changing corporate governance policies. The committee is often comprised of the chairman of the board, the deputy chairman, and the chief executive officer. The exact number of members on each committee tends to differ depending on the organization.

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