Nominee

DEFINITION of 'Nominee'

A person or firm into whose name securities or other properties are transferred in order to facilitate transactions, while leaving the customer as the actual owner.

BREAKING DOWN 'Nominee'

A "nominee account" is a type of account in which a stockbroker holds shares belonging to clients, making buying and selling those shares easier. In such an arrangement shares are said to be held in street name.

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