Non-Client Order

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DEFINITION of 'Non-Client Order'

An order on an exchange made by a participant firm or on behalf of a partner, officer, director or employee of the participant firm. Where a participant firm is a firm that is entitled to trade on the exchange, it also known as a member firm. While these orders are allowed, priority must be given to client orders for the same securities.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Non-Client Order'

Order tickets will be marked "N-C", "N", or "Emp" depending on the exchange indicating that the orders are non-client orders.

Also known as a "professional order".

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