Non-Core Assets


DEFINITION of 'Non-Core Assets '

Assets that are either not essential or simply no longer used in a company's business operations. They usually serve companies best when extra cash is needed as they can often be sold. Some businesses sell their non-core assets in order to pay down their bank debt. Non-core assets are not crucial to the continued success of a business but can still provide a valuable contribution.

BREAKING DOWN 'Non-Core Assets '

Non-core assets are likely to be sold by a company if the need for cash arises. Examples of non-core assets include real estate, commodities, natural resources, currencies, high-yield bonds and options. However, exactly what types of assets are considered non-core will vary from one business to another. For example, a real-estate investment trust would consider its real estate holdings as a core asset, while an oil company may not.

  1. Current Assets

    A balance sheet account that represents the value of all assets ...
  2. Non-Core Item

    Items that are considered outside of normal activities or operations. ...
  3. Core Assets

    An essential, important or valuable property of a business without ...
  4. Discontinued Operations

    A segment of a company's business that has been sold, disposed ...
  5. Toxic Assets

    An asset that becomes illiquid when its secondary market disappears. ...
  6. Capital Asset

    A type of asset that is not easily sold in the regular course ...
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  2. Do working capital funds expire?

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  3. What are the dormancy and escheatment rules for stock accounts?

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  4. Who decides if a financial security should be escheated?

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  5. How does escheatment impact a company?

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