Non-Core Assets

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DEFINITION of 'Non-Core Assets '

Assets that are either not essential or simply no longer used in a company's business operations. They usually serve companies best when extra cash is needed as they can often be sold. Some businesses sell their non-core assets in order to pay down their bank debt. Non-core assets are not crucial to the continued success of a business but can still provide a valuable contribution.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Non-Core Assets '

Non-core assets are likely to be sold by a company if the need for cash arises. Examples of non-core assets include real estate, commodities, natural resources, currencies, high-yield bonds and options. However, exactly what types of assets are considered non-core will vary from one business to another. For example, a real-estate investment trust would consider its real estate holdings as a core asset, while an oil company may not.

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