Non-Fluctuating

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DEFINITION of 'Non-Fluctuating'

The characteristic of constancy in a security or measurement's value, rate of change or other metric. Non-fluctuating is a feature of a fixed-rate asset which has a constant yield, such as a government-issued debenture (which, however, the market price of the debenture will fluctuate as interest rates change.) A non-fluctuating characteristic is the opposite of a volatile characteristic where changes in value do occur. An investment that has non-fluctuating returns with little risk tends to have lower returns than investments that are exposed to volatility.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Non-Fluctuating'

In contrast, common stock of a public corporation is more likely to fluctuate in both dividend yield and market price. Dividends paid on preferred stock are non-fluctuating; that is, they are paid at a fixed rate. Dividends paid on common stock, on the other hand, can fluctuate, though some secure and stable companies, such as blue chips, may offer steady dividends. Other non-fluctuating investments include money market funds (which are similar to savings accounts), savings accounts and certificates of deposit.

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