Non-Member Banks

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DEFINITION of 'Non-Member Banks'

A bank that is not a member of the U.S. Federal Reserve System. As with member banks, non-member banks are subject to reserve requirements, which they have to maintain by placing a percentage of their deposits at a Federal Reserve Bank. Although non-member banks are not required to purchase stock in their district Federal Reserve banks, they have access to Fed services such as its discount window on the same terms as member banks.

BREAKING DOWN 'Non-Member Banks'

Non-member banks can only be state-chartered, since all nationally chartered banks necessarily have to be members of the Federal Reserve System. Because state banking laws are arguably less onerous than federal banking laws, non-member banks may be subject to less regulation than member banks.

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    Contrary to conventional wisdom, the Federal Reserve is extensively audited. Politicians on the left and right of a populist ... Read Full Answer >>
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    The U.S. Treasury decides to print money in the United States as it owns and operates printing presses. However, the Federal ... Read Full Answer >>
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