Non-Owner Occupied

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DEFINITION of 'Non-Owner Occupied'

A classification used in mortgage origination, risk-based pricing and housing statistics for one to four-unit investment properties. The property is not occupied by the owner. The term non-owner occupied is not typically used for multi-family rental properties, such as apartment buildings.

BREAKING DOWN 'Non-Owner Occupied'

A mortgage on a non-owner-occupied property might have a slightly higher interest rate than an owner-occupied mortgage, as non-owner-occupied mortgages are more likely to default. Because of the higher interest rate, some unscrupulous borrowers will try to classify a non-owner-occupied mortgage as an owner-occupied mortgage to try and save money.

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