Non-Performing Asset - NPA

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DEFINITION of 'Non-Performing Asset - NPA '

A classification used by financial institutions that refer to loans that are in jeopardy of default. Once the borrower has failed to make interest or principal payments for 90 days the loan is considered to be a non-performing asset.

Also known as "non-performing loan".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Non-Performing Asset - NPA '

Non-performing assets are problematic for financial institutions since they depend on interest payments for income. Troublesome pressure from the economy can lead to a sharp increase in non-performing loans and often results in massive write-downs.

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