Non-Purpose Loan

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DEFINITION of 'Non-Purpose Loan'

A type of loan that uses an investment portfolio as loan collateral and the proceeds of which can not be used to purchase, carry or trade securities. This type of loan allows investors access to funds without having to sell their investments. Regulations require financial institutions to disclose whether a loan is a non-purpose or purpose loan, and borrowers are required to indicate the purpose of the loan.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Non-Purpose Loan'

With a non-purpose loan, investors continue to receive the benefits of their portfolio holdings, such as dividends, interest and appreciation. If the value of the pledged securities declines, however, the lender may require that additional securities be put up as collateral or that part of the loan be repaid to make up for the decrease in collateral. This type of borrowing is considered an alternative to traditional margin borrowing because it allows multiple investment accounts to be used to secure a loan.

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