Nonaccrual Loan

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Nonaccrual Loan'

A nonperforming loan that is not generating the stated interest rate because of nonpayment from the borrower, typically due to financial difficulties. Nonaccrual loans are more likely to default, meaning that the investor will not recoup his or her principal.

Standard banking regulation requires that nonperforming loans be classified as nonaccrual if principal and interest have not been paid for at least 90 days, except in cases where the lender has adequate collateral to cover the loan.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Nonaccrual Loan'

Banks and lending institutions maintain reserves to cover nonaccrual-loan losses. When borrowers resume making payments on the loan, the cash is applied first to principal and then to interest.

For bookkeeping purposes, banks deem nonaccrual loans as "cash basis loans." These loans can have interest credited only when the borrower makes payment; the bank can no longer credit the interest to its revenue until actual receipt. Interest is then recorded as earned income.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Reperforming Loan - RPL

    A loan on which the borrower was behind on payments (delinquent) ...
  2. Cash Basis Loan

    A loan where interest is recorded as earned when payment is collected. ...
  3. Default

    1. The failure to promptly pay interest or principal when due. ...
  4. Loan

    The act of giving money, property or other material goods to ...
  5. Interest Rate

    The amount charged, expressed as a percentage of principal, by ...
  6. Default Risk

    The event in which companies or individuals will be unable to ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between a write-off and a writedown?

    In terms of accounting, a write-down is performed to reduce the value of an asset to offset a loss or expense. A write-down ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does the amount of the principal fluctuate depending on inflation?

    Inflation does not affect the nominal value of the principal balance of a loan, bond or other financial instrument. Inflation ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are some good online resources for me to learn about Generally Accepted Accounting ...

    The two definitive authorities on developing and interpreting the U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do you calculate shareholder equity?

    Shareholders' equity is listed on a company's balance sheet and measures its net worth. A company's shareholders' equity ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between earnings and profit?

    Earnings, specifically retained earnings, and profit are often used as synonyms in corporate finance, although they are different ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is each party's role in a reverse repurchase agreement?

    There are two principal parties in a reverse repurchase agreement. The first party, often called the seller, is offering ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Insurance

    Is Loan Protection Insurance Right For You?

    This coverage can keep you from defaulting on your loans when you're in financial trouble.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Credit Default Swaps: An Introduction

    This derivative can help manage portfolio risk, but it isn't a simple vehicle.
  3. Budgeting

    Debt Consolidation Made Easy

    These five steps can help get you out of debt faster and easier than you'd ever imagined.
  4. Credit & Loans

    Student Loan Deferment: Live To Pay Another Day

    Extending your principal repayment date can increase your chances of fighting off default.
  5. Personal Finance

    Dawn Of The Zombie Debt

    Are old debts coming back to haunt you? We'll show you how to keep these zombies from eating you alive.
  6. Savings

    Explaining Term Deposits

    A term deposit (more often called a certificate of deposit or CD) is a deposit account that is made for a specific period of time.
  7. Economics

    Calculating Net Realizable Value

    An asset’s net realizable value is the amount a company should expect to receive once it sells or disposes of that asset, minus costs from its disposal.
  8. Savings

    Bank Lingo: Routing Number Vs. Account Number

    Each consumer bank account has its own personal ID. And so does the bank. How do these numbers function and how do they protect the account holder?
  9. Investing Basics

    Calculating Unlevered Free Cash Flow

    Unlevered free cash flow (UFCF) is the free cash flow of a business before interest payments.
  10. Taxes

    Understanding Write-Offs

    Write-off has different meanings depending on the context in which it is used, but generally refers to a reduction in value due to expense or loss.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Radner Equilibrium

    A theory suggesting that if economic decision makers have unlimited computational capacity for choice among strategies, then ...
  2. Inbound Cash Flow

    Any currency that a company or individual receives through conducting a transaction with another party. Inbound cash flow ...
  3. Social Security

    A United States federal program of social insurance and benefits developed in 1935. The Social Security program's benefits ...
  4. American Dream

    The belief that anyone, regardless of where they were born or what class they were born into, can attain their own version ...
  5. Multicurrency Note Facility

    A credit facility that finances short- to medium-term Euro notes. Multicurrency note facilities are denominated in many currencies. ...
  6. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!