Noncallable

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DEFINITION of 'Noncallable'

A financial security that cannot be redeemed early by the issuer. The issuer of a noncallable bond subjects itself to interest rate risk because, at issuance, it locks in the interest rate it will pay until the security matures. If interest rates decline, the issuer must continue paying the higher rate until the security matures.


As a result, non-callable bonds tend to pay investors a lower interest rate than callable bonds. However, the risk is lower to the investor, who is assured of receiving the stated interest rate for the duration of the security. Corporate bonds are the most common type of security that carries call provisions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Noncallable'

Bonds are often called when interest rates drop because lower interest rates mean the company can finance its debt at a lower cost. The call feature subjects investors to reinvestment risk.


The opposite of a noncallable security is a callable security. A callable security can be redeemed early and pays a premium to compensate the investor for the risk that he or she will not earn as much compared to holding the security until maturity.


Some callable bonds are noncallable for a set period after they are first issued. This time period is called a protection period.

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