Non-Controlling Interest

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Non-Controlling Interest'

An ownership stake in a corporation where the held position gives the investor no influence on how the company is run. The majority of investor positions are deemed to be a non-controlling interest because their ownership stake is so insignificant relative to the total number of outstanding shares. For smaller companies, any position that holds less than 50% of the outstanding voting shares is deemed to be a non-controlling interest.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Non-Controlling Interest'

For the majority of publically traded companies, the number of outstanding shares is so large that a normal position cannot influence higher level activity, which is why it is deemed as a non-controlling interest. It is generally not until one control's 5-10% that they can push for a seat on the board, or enact changes at the shareholders meetings by publically lobbying for them.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Outstanding Shares

    A company's stock currently held by all its shareholders, including ...
  2. Minority Interest

    1. A significant but non-controlling ownership of less than 5 ...
  3. Standard & Poor's 500 Index - S&P ...

    An index of 500 stocks chosen for market size, liquidity and ...
  4. Board Of Directors - B Of D

    A group of individuals that are elected as, or elected to act ...
  5. Majority Shareholder

    A person or entity that owns more than 50% of a company's outstanding ...
  6. Voting Shares

    Shares that give the stockholder the right to vote on matters ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How does the market share of a few companies affect the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index ...

    In economics and commercial law, the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI) is a widely used measure that indicates the amount ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What does the rule of 70 indicate about a country's future economic growth?

    The rule of 70 could be used to indicate the approximate number of years that it would take a company's economic growth to ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How is the rule of 70 related to the growth rate of a variable?

    The rule of 70 is related to the growth rate of a variable because it uses the growth rate in its approximation of the number ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why should investors research the C-suite executives of a company?

    C-suite executives are essential for creating and enacting overall firm strategy and are therefore an important aspect of ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between a direct and an indirect distribution channel?

    A direct distribution channel is organized and managed by the firm itself. An indirect distribution channel relies on intermediaries ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the benefits of using ceteris paribus assumptions in economics?

    Most, though not all, economists rely on ceteris paribus conditions to build and test economic models. The reason they do ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    The Two Sides Of Dual-Class Shares

    Find out how dual-class shares can affect a company's performance.
  2. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Proxy Voting Gives Fund Shareholders A Say

    You have the right to take part in important company decisions - even if you cannot attend the meetings.
  3. Investing Basics

    Knowing Your Rights As A Shareholder

    We delve into common stock owners' privileges and how to be vigilant in monitoring a company.
  4. Professionals

    Acquire A Career In Mergers

    This exciting sector demands a lot from its advisors. Are you up for it?
  5. Investing

    Digging In To 13D Disclosures

    This document can provide important clues about a company and its stock.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating Future Value

    Future value is the value of an asset or cash at a specified date in the future that is equivalent in value to a specified sum today.
  7. Economics

    What is Deadweight Loss?

    Mainly used in economics, deadweight loss can be applied to any deficiency caused by an inefficient allocation of resources.
  8. Investing

    The Strong Dollar’s (Real) Toll On Tech Stocks

    A large portion of U.S. technology companies’ sales occur overseas, given the strong international business and consumer demand from many U.S. tech firms.
  9. Economics

    How to Do a Cost-Benefit Analysis

    The benefits of a given situation or business-related action are summed and then the costs associated with taking that action are subtracted.
  10. Stock Analysis

    Google Stock: A Tale of Two Share Classes

    Google stock comes in two different flavors with different rights for shareholders.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Covered Call

    An options strategy whereby an investor holds a long position in an asset and writes (sells) call options on that same asset ...
  2. Butterfly Spread

    A neutral option strategy combining bull and bear spreads. Butterfly spreads use four option contracts with the same expiration ...
  3. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
  4. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
  5. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
  6. Productivity

    An economic measure of output per unit of input. Inputs include labor and capital, while output is typically measured in ...
Trading Center