Noncredit Services

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Noncredit Services'

Fee-based services that do not involve the extension of credit that a lending institution offers to correspondent banks or corporate customers. Non-interest income generated from noncredit services can be a significant source of revenue for banks and financial institutions. Examples of noncredit services include trust and investment-related revenues, global cash management, foreign currency exchange, etc.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Noncredit Services'

Noncredit services enable a bank to grow revenues without putting its assets at risk. Increasingly high priority noncredit services for banks and financial institutions include global custody - safely processing shares for funds managers - and cash management - helping businesses maintain an appropriate corporate cash balances without jeopardizing their short-term liquidity.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Private Label Credit Card

    Many stores offer private label credit cards to their customers ...
  2. Credit

    1. A contractual agreement in which a borrower receives something ...
  3. Revenue

    The amount of money that a company actually receives during a ...
  4. Finance

    The science that describes the management, creation and study ...
  5. Revolving Credit

    A line of credit where the customer pays a commitment fee and ...
  6. Line Of Credit - LOC

    An arrangement between a financial institution, usually a bank, ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How are contingent liabilities reflected on a balance sheet

    Contingent liabilities need to pass two thresholds before they can be reported in the financial statements. First, it must ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do businesses determine if an asset may be impaired?

    In the United States, assets are considered impaired when net carrying value (book value) exceeds expected future cash flows. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How can I set up an accrual accounting system for a small business?

    First, determine whether accrual accounting makes the most sense practically and financially. If the small business is also ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why is work in progress (WIP) considered a current asset in accounting?

    Accountants consider work in progress (WIP) to be a current asset because it is a type of inventory asset. Accountants consider ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What exactly does EBITDA margin tell investors about a company?

    EBITDA stands for earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization. EBITDA margins provide investors a snapshot ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can you use a cash flow statement to make a budget?

    To use the cash flow statement to make a budget, a company needs to combine the operating cash flow portion of its cash flow ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Savings

    Are Your Bank Deposits Insured?

    Learn how the FDIC is helping to keep your money in your pockets.
  2. Forex Education

    Currency Exchange: Floating Rate Vs. Fixed Rate

    Baffled by exchange rates? Wonder why some currencies fluctuate while others are pegged? This article has the answers.
  3. Insurance

    What Is The World Bank?

    You've heard of the World Bank, now find out how it functions and why some groups oppose it.
  4. Personal Finance

    The Currency Board: Understanding The Government's Bank

    Currency board, central bank - what's the difference? Find out more about this little-known monetary authority.
  5. Personal Finance

    What Are Central Banks?

    They print money, they control inflation, and much, much more. All you need to know about central banks is here.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    An Introduction To The International Monetary Fund (IMF)

    Chances are you've heard of the IMF. But what does it do, and why is it so controversial?
  7. Options & Futures

    Who Backs Up The FDIC?

    The FDIC insures depositors against loss, but what happens if it runs out of money?
  8. Credit & Loans

    What's a Revolving Line of Credit?

    A revolving line of credit is an arrangement made between a company or an individual and a bank to borrow money on a short-term basis.
  9. Savings

    Explaining Checking Accounts

    A checking account is an account at a financial institution, usually a bank, that allows for deposits and withdrawals.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    What is Quantitative Analysis?

    Quantitative analysis refers to the use of mathematical computations to analyze markets and investments.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Expected Return

    The amount one would anticipate receiving on an investment that has various known or expected rates of return. For example, ...
  2. Carrying Value

    An accounting measure of value, where the value of an asset or a company is based on the figures in the company's balance ...
  3. Capital Account

    A national account that shows the net change in asset ownership for a nation. The capital account is the net result of public ...
  4. Brand Equity

    The value premium that a company realizes from a product with a recognizable name as compared to its generic equivalent. ...
  5. Adverse Selection

    1. The tendency of those in dangerous jobs or high risk lifestyles to get life insurance. 2. A situation where sellers have ...
Trading Center